13 October 2012

Half Bath Re-Do

As I mentioned the other day, we've been in this house about 5 years now. One of the first things we did after moving in was re-do the half-bath in the foyer. When you look at the pictures below, you'll see why we were in such a hurry...


Yep. That's wallpaper and bright, shiny brass fixtures. The room was stuck in the 90's.

Since I was using earthy, Tuscan colors in the other first floor rooms, I decided to use a muted grape/eggplant color on the walls, and oil-rubbed bronze fixtures and accessories. We figured this room would be a snap to re-do since it's so small...

Wrong.

Whoever put up the wallpaper put it directly on the drywall without any type of primer. So when we removed it, we also removed pieces of drywall. Oops. (That's not what Gus said, but I can't print what he said...) Should we put up new drywall? Or do we try to find some other way to "fix" the walls? I decided to give Venetian plaster a try. I wanted to do it in the kitchen and I figured since the bathroom was small, it would be good practice.


Well. It was very time-consuming - even in such a small room. But it looked great - the damage was covered and the color and finish were awesome.

Now it was Gus's turn. He needed to change the handle on the toilet, the fixtures on the sink, the outlet, and the switch plate. No big deal, right?

Wrong.

The toilet, outlet, and switch plate was a piece of cake. But whoever put the pedestal sink in cemented it to the slate floor. So when Gus had to move it to get to the water lines, it cracked the top layer of slate off one of the tiles. Luckily, since the finish on the tiles was uneven anyway, it wasn't really noticeable.

Once that was fixed, there were no more problems. And the sink looked great! I also changed the mirror, but if Pinterest had been around back then, I would have probably just repainted the old one! (You can't really tell in the picture, but the new mirror has a pewter finish with dark brown accents.)


In case you've never worked with Venetian plaster, it's a 3 to 4 step process - and you have to wait a day in-between steps. When you're finished, you have a shiny surface that is completely smooth, but looks as if it's rough. It's really pretty cool - but I won't be doing it in the kitchen.  :-)


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